Tag Archive for Snack

Banana Bread Muffins

A lovely moist muffin with the flavours of banana bread.

BananaBreadMuffin2

Banana Bread Muffins (makes 10)
Heavily adapted from “Leon – Ingredients & Recipes”

2 eggs
1/3 cup + 1 tbsp oil
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
3 small ripe banana, mashed
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 cup bran
Optional: a handful of chopped pecans or blueberries
Optional: oats or pumpkin/sunflower seeds for the tops

Preheat the oven to 175C. Line a muffin tin with paper liners.
Mix the eggs, oil, vanilla extract, banana and brown sugar. Add flour, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, bran and fold through. Fold through the pecans or blueberries if using. Divide over 10 muffin cups.
Place in the oven and bake for about 30 minutes. They will rise high. Leave to cool on a rack. Suitable to freeze.

Oat-Blueberry Muffin

If you follow my blog, you’ll probably have noticed that I like blueberry muffins and am always keen to try out a new recipe. This one is a lower carb higher protein variety. The muffins are nice, but not really muffin-like, they are more like baked oatmeal. Which I like too, so that is not a problem. They taste best when they are freshly baked, they tend to get soggy with storing.
When I make these next time, I will try and swap the flour for protein powder, to make them even more low carb high protein.

Blueberry Oat Muffin

Oat-Blueberry Muffin (makes 6)
Adapted from Libelle

150 g light cream cheese
2 eggs
2 tbsp flour
10 tbsp oats
1 tbsp honing
1 sachet vanilla sugar
pinch of cinnamon
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
125 g blueberries

Preheat the oven to 180C. Place 6 paper liners in a muffin tin.
Mix all the ingredients, except the blueberries, in a bowl to a thick batter. Fold in the blueberries. Divide the batter over the muffin holes.
Bake in the oven for 20-30 minutes. Leave to cool on a wire rack.

Whole grain oat blueberry muffins

Not too sweet, moist, fruity and with a lovely texture. They freeze well.

Whole Grain Oat Blueberry Muffin

Whole grain oat blueberry muffins (makes 12)
Adapted from Betty Crocker

1 cup buttermilk (or use milk mixed with a few tbsp yoghurt)
1 cup oats
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp salt
1 cup blueberries (frozen is fine)

Heat oven to 200C. Place paper baking cup in each of 12 regular-size muffin cups.
In small bowl, pour buttermilk over oats; set aside. In large bowl, mix oil, brown sugar and egg with spoon. Stir in flours, baking soda, cinnamon and salt just until flours are moistened. Stir in oat mixture; fold in blueberries. Divide batter evenly among muffin cups.
Bake 15 to 20 minutes or until golden brown. Cool 5 minutes; remove from pan. Serve warm or leave to cool on a rack.

Blueberry Oat Muffins

These muffins are moist and filled with juicy blueberries, perfect as a healthy snack. Make a batch, freeze, and take one out when you want a bite to eat.

Blueberry Oat Muffins

Blueberry Oat Muffins (makes 12)
Adapted from From The Kitchen

1 1/2 cup self raising flour
1 cup oats, whizzed in food processor to a flour
1 tsp baking powder
3/4 cup sugar
1 cup blueberries (frozen is fine)
1/2 cup oil
1 egg
1 1/4 cups buttermilk (or 50:50 milk:yoghurt)

Preheat oven to 180C and line a 12 hole muffin tin with liners.
Mix flour, oats, baking powder and caster sugar. Stir through blueberries. Whisk oil, egg and buttermilk together, add to flour mix and fold wet mix into dry.
Divide evenly amongst the holes and bake for 15-20 minutes.

Applesauce Oat Muffins

These muffins are really, really moist and tasty; they also freeze fantastically. Another recipe for my healthy-snack repertoire.

Applesauce Oat Muffins

Applesauce Oat Muffins (makes 12)
Adapted from Mel’s Kitchen Cafe

1 cup oats
1 cup unsweetened applesauce (from 2 large apples)
1/2 cup milk
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla extract
60 g butter, melted
1/3 cup sugar
3/4 cup whole wheat flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp salt
Optional: 1/2 cup dried cranberries or raisins

Preheat the oven to 190C. Line a 12-cup muffin tin with liners or grease the muffin cups. Set aside..
Stir together the oatmeal, applesauce, milk, egg, vanilla, butter and sugar. In another bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and salt (and cranberries or raisins if using). Make a well in the center and pour in the applesauce mixture. Stir until just combined.
Distribute the batter evenly among the 12 muffin cups. Bake for 15-20 minutes until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.
Remove the muffins to a rack to cool completely.

Olive Oil and Cider Carrot Cake

A lovely dense, spicy and moist carrot cake. It is not too sweet and not very fatty, which together with the whole grain flour, carrots and apple juice makes it quite a healthy cake. So it is perfect for those normal days, on which you still want to have something nice in the afternoon with a cup of tea, but nothing too heavy or too indulgent. I love a thick slice of it with some cream cheese mixed with a little brown sugar, maple syrup and vanilla.
You can keep it at room temperature for a few days, or supposedly longer in the fridge. I didn’t try storing it in the fridge, because I always find storing baked goods in the fridge a bit iffy. But if you do want to keep it longer, slice the cake, put in a freezer container with baking paper between the layers and freeze. It will keep for about 2 months in the freezer. When you want a slice, take it out and leave to defrost at room temperature, or put it in the bread toaster.

Carrot Cake

Olive Oil and Cider Carrot Cake (for 1 23×13 cm loaf pan)
Slightly adapted from Smitten Kitchen

200 g flour
90 g whole wheat flour
3/4 tsp salt
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp speculaas spices
1/2 cup olive oil
145 g brown sugar
2 eggs
1 cup soft cider (fresh, unfiltered apple juice)
1 tsp vanilla extract
260 g coarsely grated carrots
Olive oil for baking pan

Heat the oven to 175C. Coat a loaf pan with olive oil.
In a large bowl, whisk together both flours, salt, baking powder, cinnamon and speculaas spices. In a medium bowl, whisk together olive oil, brown sugar, eggs, cider and vanilla. Stir grated carrots into wet ingredients until evenly coated, then stir wet ingredients into dry just until no floury bits remain.
Pour into the prepared pan and bake for 60 to 70 minutes, until a skewer inserted into the center comes out batter-free. Let cool in loaf pan for 20 to 30 minutes, then remove from pan and cool the rest of the way on a rack.

Broad bean purée

This purée is very versatile. It is delicious as a side-dish with all kinds of meats, it is delicious as a dip for bread sticks, it is delicious as a spread on bruscetta and it works also great as a pasta sauce (thin it with some water in that case). Double-podding all the broad beans is a bit of a job, but the end-result makes it certainly worth it. And I kind of like the repetition of podding beans, it is quite a meditative activity. So why not make a big batch even when you will not eat it at once? It keeps for 4 days in the fridge, so it is a great stand-by for an easy dinner, or a delicious snack.
On the photo you can see I served the purée with a beefburger and fried polenta squares. You make this squares by cooking your polenta according to the instructions on the package. Season with salt, pepper, a knob of butter, some cream or mascarpone and parmesan. Pour into a greased baking dish (so that it forms a thin and even layer) and leave to cool. It should be completely cool, so I like to place the baking dish in the fridge for at least 1 hour. Cut into squares and fry in a hot pan in some olive oil until golden and crisp on the outside, and warm in the middle.

Broad Bean Puree

Broad bean purée (serves 4-6)
Adapted from “Annabel Langbein – The Free Range Cook”

1 kg podded fresh or frozen broad beans (or 5 kg fresh broad beans in their pods, podded)
3 cloves garlic, chopped very finely
4 tbsp extra vergine olive oil
50 g grated Parmesan
salt and pepper
1-2 tbsp water
Optional: squeeze of lemon

If broad beans are fresh, boil them for 2 minutes then drain. If using frozen broad beans, pour over boiling water and leave until cool enough to handle. Slip off greyish outer skins by grasping each bean by its grooved end and squeezing gently. Discard skins.
Put the beans, garlic, olive oil, salt and pepper in a food processor and purée. Taste for seasoning, add more salt and pepper if necessary. The purée can be kept in an airtight container in the fridge for 4 days.
To serve, add the water and warm on low heat while stirring regularly. Add a squeeze of lemon juice if you like. Serve.

Note: to make this dish truly vegetarian, use a vegetarian alternative for Parmesan cheese.

Courgette Oatmeal Bars

And here is another recipe to use up courgettes. These bars are soft, sturdy and filling. I like it when things like this are not too sweet, but this recipe makes bars that are really just barely sweet. They were almost not sweet enough for my taste (although my husband adores them as they are), so when you like things to be sweeter, add more honey. They have quite an unique taste and texture, so it is quite hard to describe it accurately. Think more along the line of a sturdy baked oatmeal, than something like a cookie bar. They can be frozen very well, so you can make a batch and eat a square each day as a snack.

Courgette oatmeal bars (18 squares)
Slightly adapted from A Sweet Baker

2 cups grated courgette (about 1 large or 2 small courgettes)
2 eggs
1/4 cup coconut oil
1/4 cup milk
1/2 cup honey
1/2 cup mashed banana (about 1 medium banana)
1 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
4 cup rolled oats
1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup walnuts

Preheat the oven to 175C and line a 23×33 cm baking dish with baking paper.
Mix courgette, eggs, coconut oil, milk, honey, banana, cinnamon, nutmeg and vanilla well. Stir through the rolled oats, them fold in the raisins and walnuts.
Transfer the mixture to the prepared baking dish and flatten with the back of a spoon until it is even.
Bake for 20-25 minutes or until top is golden brown. Remove from the baking dish (using the baking paper) and place on a wire rack to cool completely. Cut into squares and store in an airtight container for 2 days, or freeze them.

Carrot Courgette Muffins

Another recipe for the courgette surplus. These muffins are very moist, which means that they keep well and can be frozen as well. The moistness mainly comes from the carrot and the courgette, but the muffins certainly don’t taste like vegetables. They are barely sweet, and walnuts add a bit more texture. Because the muffins consist mainly of vegetables and whole wheat flour, and only have a little bit added sugar (in the form of honey/maple syrup) and fat, they are actually quite healthy and filling. My muffins are a bit darker than you can expect from the recipe, because I used stroop (Dutch molasses/treacle), which is darker than honey/maple syrup.

Carrot Courgette Muffins

Carrot Courgette Muffins (12 muffins)
Slightly adapted from Cupcakes & Kale Chips

1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
45 g butter, melted and cooled
1/2 cup honey or maple syrup
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 cup finely grated courgette
1/2 cup finely grated carrot
1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup coarsely chopped walnuts

Preheat the oven to 175C and line a muffin pan with paper or silicon liners.
Mix flour, cinnamon, salt and baking soda, and mix together butter, honey, egg and vanilla extract in another bowl. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and stir together until just combined. Add the courgette, carrot, raisins and walnuts and stir until just mixed. Divide the batter over the muffin cups.
Bake for 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until a toothpick inserted in the middle of a muffin comes out clean. Leave to cool 10 minutes in the muffin pan, then take out to cool further.
Store in an airtight container for 3 days maximum, or freeze.

Dutch food: Dutch Snacks

I’m not really into the whole football thing, but I do watch the world championship matches in which the Netherlands play, to stay up to date. To make it a bit more interesting, I decided to make a Dutch snack board, with all kind of classic Dutch snacks and appetizers. On a traditional Dutch birthday party you usually arrive in the afternoon, get pie and a cup of tea first, then coffee and a bonbon, and then snacks and drinks; you leave at the end of the afternoon/beginning of the evening. Sometimes coffee/chocolate isn’t served, and sometimes (especially when the party is in the evening) there is no pie served either. In some families it is habit that the guests stay for dinner.
The snacks below are the traditional ones you could expect on a (birthday) party, although nowadays people also serve other things, for example all kinds of things inspired on other cultures, like tapas. The amount and variety of snacks served depends on how much guests there will be and if it is an informal/small party or something big.

Dutch Snacks

From left to right, top to bottom: smoked beef-egg rolls, cucumber slices, ham-herbed cream cheese rolls, salami-cream cheese rolls, cheese, liver sausage, salami-gherkin rolls, cheese with pickled onion, grilled sausage with cheese, devilled eggs, ham-asparagus rolls.

On the board

Cubes/wedges of Dutch cheese
The world-famous Gouda cheese comes from the Netherlands. It comes in different ages, ranging from young (quite soft, creamy and mild) via matured to extra old (hard, crumbly, piquant). There are also many cheeses available that have an addition, for example cumin, clove, fenugreek or nettles; nowadays lots of cheesemakers also experiment with other flavours like pesto, herb/spice mixes and wasabi. I would suggest to serve a young mature (a cheese that everyone likes) and something special in addition. Unfortunately, the name Gouda isn’t protected, so abroad most Gouda doesn’t taste like it should. If you want to try real Dutch Gouda, look for ones that are called “Noord-Hollandse Gouda” (Noord-Holland is a province in the Netherlands), “Boerenkaas” (farmhouse cheese) and “Gouda-Holland”, these have a Protected Geographical Indication status, which means that they can only be made in the Netherlands and can only use milk produced by Dutch cows.

Garnished cubes of cheese
Use a cocktail stick to garnish cubes of cheese with pickled onion (on the board), gherkin, olives, confit ginger, pineapple, mandarin, peach or grape.

Slices of sausage
You cannot have a Dutch snack board without sausage. There are many kinds of sausages available in the Netherlands, for example “gekookte worst” (literally cooked sausage, similar to rookworst or Frankfurters, but always served cold), “leverworst” (literally liver sausage, abroad sometimes known as liverwurst; a finely ground sausage made with pork liver, meat, fat and spices; available firm (as on the board), or spreadable (often eaten as bread or cracker topping)), “metworst” and “droge worst” (literally dried sausage; spiced air-dried pork sausage, similar to salami, lots of regional varieties available), “grill worst” (grilled sausage, can be made with different kinds of meat, the outside is liberally spiced, can contain bits of cheese (like on the board) or sateh sauce) or “Zeeuws spek” (bacon from the Dutch province Zeeland, bacon marinated in a spice mixture and grilled).

Rolls
The thinly sliced cold meats that we generally use in the Netherlands as a bread topping are also great for making snacks. Salami can be filled with a tiny gherkin (or quarter larger gherkins lenghtways), or can be spread with herbed cream cheese and rolled. Ham can be filled with some cooked white asparagus, either from a jar or freshly cooked, or can be spread with herbed cream cheese and rolled. Rookvlees (literally smoked meat, salted smoked beef) can be filled with quartered cooked eggs. All these rolls can either be served with a cocktail stick pricked in them, or with a container of cocktail sticks on the side, so that people can prick the snacks they choose themselves. Without cocktail sticks these snacks are a bit unwieldy.

Vegetables
Commonly a few slices of cucumber. Sometimes more vegetables (think crudité) are given with one or more dips. There are dipping sauce mixes available in the supermarkets, or some people make their own simple yoghurt/mayo dip.

Devilled eggs
I make them by taking out the yolks from halved boiled eggs, mashing them with some mayonnaise to make a thick paste, season with salt and pepper and scoop this back in the egg whites. To make them a bit more posh you could add some chopped fresh herbs like parsley and chives, and pipe the filling instead of scooping it into the egg whites. Over here some more variations can be found.

Not on the board

These snacks are commonly served as well, but weren’t on my board, because it only was for a few people.

Savoury snacks
For example different flavours of potato chips, different kinds and flavours of nuts, salty biscuits, pretzels, cheese straws and cheese palmiers (we call them cheese butterflies).

Herring on rye bread
You can put both salted and pickled herring on rye bread. Some people add some raw onions on top, but not everyone likes this.

Small toasts/crackers with topping
There are lots of different crackers available in the supermarkets. The most well known are melba toast and water biscuit/saltine crackers. Toppings can be all kinds of things, for example cheeses (brie, camenbert, port salut, roquefort, etc), salads, pate, (smoked) fish or ossenworst (raw beef sausage). Sometimes these “toastjes” (literally small toasts) are pre-made by the host, but usually the toasts and toppings are placed on the table so people can help themselves.

Raw-ham melon rolls
I think this combination became more popular in the seventies or eighties, when foreign flavour combinations became more popular, and these ingredients became available as well. I like this one a lot, because it is lighter and fresher than most of the other snacks. Unfortunately, I could not find a nice, ripe melon, so I could not make this for my snack board.

A warm snack
Often there is a warm snack for the end of the afternoon. This can be a “bitterbal” or something else from the deep-fryer, small frankfurters with something to dip them in (usually mustard and/or curry sauce), or small meatballs (sometimes with sateh sauce).