Tag Archive for Egg

Petit Pots de Crème Vanille

Delicate, creamy pots of loveliness. Don’t try to make these with synthetic vanilla, it won’t work.

The original recipe asks you to whisk the eggs and sugar together until pale and thick, but if you do that, the pots will deflate a lot during the baking. I think it is best to either don’t whisk the eggs until pale and thick, but just to incorporate everything. Or beating them till pale and thick, but setting aside the mixture to let the bubbles settle before baking. The photo shows the pots before baking, you can see the foaminess on top.

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Petit Pots de Crème Vanille (makes 2-4 servings)
Adapted from “Ripailles – Stéphane Reynaud”

125 ml cream
150 ml milk
1/2 vanilla pod
2 eggs
40 g sugar

Whisk the eggs with the sugar.
Heat the milk and cream. Scrape the seeds from the vanilla pod, add these and add the pod too.
Take the vanilla pod from the boiling milk and pour over the egg mixture while whisking.
Pour into ramekins and bake for 20 minutes au bain marie in a 180C oven, making sure the water comes high enough up the sides of the ramekin. You can cover the ramekins with tinfoil to prevent browning.
Serve at room temperature or cold.

Leche Frita

Leche frita, literally meaning fried milk, is a thick vanilla custard coated in breadcrumbs and deep-fried, and sometimes coated with cinnamon sugar. The crispy outside contrasts lovely with the oozy soft inside, it is as much about the texture as about the flavour. It is rather indulgent, so I only make it as a special treat. It is a dessert, but you could also serve it as a snack with coffee, or something like that. As with all deep-fried things, serve them straight away after frying.

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Leche Frita (serves 6)
Adapted from “Rick Stein’s Spain”

500 ml full fat milk
1 tsp vanilla extract (or 1 vanilla pod)
4 egg yolks
100 g sugar
30 g flour
40 g cornflour
oil for deep-frying
flour, egg and breadcrumbs for crumbing
Optional: cinnamon sugar to serve

Grease a shallow 19 cm square baking tin with a little oil (or use a silicon form instead).
Mix sugar, flour and cornflour in a large bowl. Add the egg yolks and a splash of milk, and mix it to a smooth paste. Bring the rest of the milk to the boil. Pour slowly onto the egg mixture, while whisking. Pour back into the pan, on medium heat, and cook for about 5 minutes while stirring continuous, until you have a very thick custard. Pour the mixture in the prepared tin, press a sheet of clingfilm on the surface, and cool for at least 2 hours in the fridge.
Turn the set custard out on a board and cut into small triangles (or another shape that you fancy). Put flour, egg and breadcrumbs in 3 separate shallow dishes. Dip a triangle in flour, then in the egg, and then in the breadcrumbs. Lower in the oil and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until crisp and golden. Leave to drain on some kitchen paper, then serve (dusted with cinnamon sugar if you like).

Plain Vanilla Pudding

A simple, plain pudding. Tasty warm, but also nice cold from the fridge. Even when cold, it has a nice, soft texture. Top with fruit, caramel sauce, bits of chocolate or cookie crumbles as variation.

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Plain Vanilla Pudding (4 ramekins)
Adapted from Food Network Magazine

100 g sugar
20 g cornstarch (or unsweetened custard powder)
pinch of salt
500 ml milk
1 egg
1 tbsp vanilla extract (use less when using custard powder)
15 g butter

Mix sugar, cornstarch and salt in a large, heatproof bowl. Gradually add half of the milk, while whisking. Then whisk in the egg. Bring the other half of the milk to the boil and gradually add to the mix, while whisking constantly. Pour into the pan, and cook on medium heat until it thickens, while stirring continuously. Take from the heat and pour back into the bowl, then mix in the vanilla extract and butter. Divide over ramekins and eat hot, or place at least 2 hours in the fridge (covered with clingfilm).

Omelet Wrap

Tortilla wraps with cream cheese and smoked salmon are a classic. I decided to make a variation on this, it is nice to do something different sometimes.
These wraps are very nice for lunch.

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Omelet Wrap (1 wrap)

2 eggs
splash of milk
salt and pepper
few leafs of lettuce
1-2 tbsp light cream cheese
some chopped up parsley and chives
smoked fish (I like mackerel or trout for this recipe)

Mix the eggs with a splash of milk and some salt and pepper. Bake into a thin omelet.
Mix the cream cheese with some salt and pepper, and the chopped herbs.
Place the lettuce on the omelet, spread with the cream cheese, then sprinkle over the smoked fish. Roll up as a wrap.

Gado gado

Gado gado is an Indonesian dish of vegetables with peanut sauce. It can be served as a main, but also as part of an Indonesian meal with several different dishes.

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Peanut sauce
Slightly adapted from “Kook nu eens zelf Indisch en Chinees- Nique van der Werff-Wijsman”

1 onion
2 cloves garlic
1/2 tsp sambal oelek or sambal badjak
1/4 tsp trasi
salt
1/2 tbsp oil
2 tbsp peanut butter (all natural, no ingredients except peanut)
1 tbsp ketjap manis
1 tsp goela jawa (palm sugar)
1/2 tsp tamarind paste
200 ml water
1/2 cm from a block of santen (creamed coconut)

Finally chop the onion and garlic. Use a mortar and pestle or blender to make into a purée, mix with the sambal, trasi and salt.
Heat the oil in a saucepan. Add the purée and sauté on medium heat until most of the moisture is evaporated, and the mixture doesn’t smell raw any more.
Add peanut butter, ketjap, goela jawa, tamarind paste and water. Mix well. Leave to bubble for a bit, until the sauce has the desired consistency. Add some more water if you think it’s too thick. Add the santen and mix. Taste and season with salt, goela jawa and tamarind paste if necessary. Serve.

Gado gado
200-300 g raw/cooked vegetables per person (can be cold or hot), for example cabbage, green beans, carrot, taugé, cucumber, cauliflower, potato
boiled eggs and/or fried tofu
peanut sauce
To serve (optional): rice, krupuk

Serve all the ingredients with the peanut sauce poured over.

To make this dish vegan, don’t use the trasi (which is fermented shrimp paste), and make sure your sambal doesn’t contain shrimp paste. Also, don’t serve the dish with eggs. Krupuk contains shrimp, use cassava chips as an alternative.

Lemon Meringue Pie

Usually, these kinds of tarts have a lemon curd-like filling, that has to be cooked before pouring into the pastry case. This one you can just mix and pour in. Even though it is made with condensed milk, it doesn’t have that sickly sweetness that is associated with sweetened condensed milk. It makes a lovely fresh, lemony, soft filling that just holds it’s shape. I love it together with the crisp pastry and the fluffy meringue.

Once baked, the pie can be eaten warm or cold. The meringue will shrink a little after a while. Also, it might ooze some sugar syrup, which isn’t pretty, but doesn’t impair the flavour. The pie can be kept up to 2 days (refridgerated).

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Lemon Meringue Pie
Adapted from “Mary Berry’s Baking Bible”

pastry for 1 crust

1 can condensed milk
3 egg yolks
finely grated rind and juice of 3 lemons

3 egg whites
175 g sugar

Preheat the oven to 220C. Roll out the dough. Line a pie-dish with it. Take a sheet of baking paper, crumble it, then smooth it out again. Use this to line the dough, then pour in pie weights or dry beans. Place in the oven, bake 12-15 minutes (the edges should be lightly golden). Remove baking paper and weights, and return the crust to the oven for another 5 minutes.
Meanwhile, prepare the filling by mixing the condensed milk, egg yolks, lemon rind and lemon juice. Whisk the egg whites until stiff but not dry. Gradually add the sugar, a spoon at the time, whisking well between each addition. Whisk until very stiff and all the sugar has been added.
Turn down the oven to 190C. Pour the lemon filling in the crust. Dollop the meringue on top and swirl a little, or use a piping bag to pipe it on. Bake for 15-20 minutes, or until the meringue is light brown. Leave to cool for a minimum of 30 minutes before serving.

Bread and butter pudding

When we returned from France, we had 2 baguettes leftover. As you may know, French bread is best on the day it is baked; it turns stale very quickly. And these baguettes were already 2 days old. I hate to throw away food, so I decided to make them into bread and butter pudding. A classic oven-baked British dessert, in which the bread is smeared with butter, scattered with raisins and soaked with custard. Officially it is dessert, but I rather have it as a (luxurious) weekend breakfast, since it is quite heavy. The recipe below is a mix of ones I found in several of my cookbooks, tweaked to my liking.

Pretty classic bread and butter pudding (serves 6-8)
2 stale baguettes, sliced, ends used for something else
25 g butter, melted
75 g sugar
100 g raisins

250 ml cream
350 ml milk
1 tsp vanilla extract
pinch of cinnamon
2 eggs
2 egg yolks

2 tbsp sugar, to sprinkle on top.

Grease a large, deep ovenproof dish (18×23 cm) with a little of the butter.
Cover the base of the dish with about 1/3 of the slices of bread. Brush with 1/3 of the butter. Sprinkle with 1/2 the sugar and 1/2 the raisins. Layer the 2nd 1/3 of bread on top, brush again with butter and sprinkle the other half of the sugar and raisins over. Cover with the remaining portion of bread.
Mix cream, milk, vanilla extract, cinnamon, eggs and yolks. Pour over the pudding and leave to stand for 1 hour (can be kept overnight covered in the fridge).
Preheat the oven to 180C. Brush the top of the pudding with the remaining butter, then sprinkle over the sugar.
Bake in the pre-heated oven for about 40 minutes, or until the top is golden brown, crisp and slightly puffy. Serve immediately, don’t let it get cold.

Variation: you can used (white/brown) sliced bread with the crusts removed, or use brioche/croissants to make it extra luxurious.

Strawberry Pavlova

The meringue is soft and marshmallowy on the inside and crisp on the outside. Together with the creaminess of the cream and the freshness of the strawberries, this make a lovely dessert. You can use any fruit you like instead of the strawberries.

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Strawberry Pavlova (serves 6)
Slightly adapted from “Mary Berry’s Baking Bible”

4 egg whites
225 g caster sugar or fine sugar (no icing sugar)
2 tsp corn starch
2 tsp white wine vinegar

300 ml cream, whipped with 2 tbsp sugar and if you like, a drop of vanilla extract
350 g strawberries, de-hulled and halved/quartered

Preheat the oven to 150C. Line a baking tray with baking paper.
Put the egg whites in a large bowl and whip to soft peaks. Then add the sugar spoon by spoon, while whisking. Keep whisking until the sugar is completely dissolved. Test this by rubbing a little of the mix between your fingers: if it feels sandy/grainy, the sugar has not yet dissolved completely. Blend the corn starch with the vinegar, add to the meringue and mix well.
Dollop the meringue on the baking tray, into a circle of about 23 cm, with higher sides than the middle. It should look quite rough, peaky and rustic. Place in the oven and bake for about 1 hour. Leave to cool in the oven (that you turned off!) with the door closed.
Place the pavlova on a serving plate. Top with the whipped cream and strawberries, then serve. Can be kept for 1 hour in the fridge before serving.

Brown Rice Bowl

Rice bowls are trendy. Or maybe something else is trendy now, I try to follow the new developments in foodie world, but every once in a while you miss something. It is really simple, you take a bowl of rice, arrange things you like on top, mix everything together and eat. The toppings can be anything, but are usually high on vegetables, since this is a healthy trend. And because of that health, I started with a bowl of brown rice. I topped it with edamame, pickled cucumber, bean sprouts sautéed with some sesame oil and soy sauce, strips of omelet, nori flakes and a sauce made from sambal badjak, soy sauce and rice vinegar. Other vegetables you see often are carrots, spring onions, sautéed spinach and sautéed paksoi. Some form of egg is classic as protein, it can also be fried or even raw (it cooks when it comes into contact with the hot bowl/hot other ingredients), but something like roast pork is also possible. And sesame seeds are often used together with the nori flakes. But I’ve seen non-Asian rice bowl variants as well, for example with beans, spicy minced meat, avocado and corn for a Mexican-style bowl. The possibilities are endless.

Brown Rice Bowl

Raspberry Bread Pudding

Bread pudding contains breakfast-y ingredients like bread, fruit, eggs and milk. So if you don’t go overboard with cream, butter and other things like that, and don’t make it too sweet, it is perfectly acceptable to eat bread pudding for breakfast. Although it would be delicious as dessert too. The original recipe suggested to use cinnamon swirl whole grain bread, but since you can’t buy that over here I chose a slightly more indulgent bread: brioche. But I’ll try it with normal whole wheat bread in the future, I expect that would be nice too. As variation you could use other kinds of fruit. You can remove the crusts from the bread, but I don’t think it is necessary/worth the work and waste.
The result is like bread-pudding, soft and slightly wet, not too sweet, with a nice tartness from the raspberries, and a crispy, slightly caramelized top.

Raspberry Bread Pudding

Raspberry Bread Pudding (serves 2)
Adapted from Naturally Ella

4 slices bread
3/4 cup raspberries
2 eggs
3/4 cup milk
1 tbsp maple syrup (or use honey instead)
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
pinch of cinnamon
pinch of salt
1 tbsp sugar

Overnight or at least one hour before wanting to bake, cut bread slices in half on the diagonal and place in a baking pan that is roughly 15×20 cm. Squash raspberries in between the slices.
Whisk together eggs, milk, maple syrup, vanilla, cinnamon and salt. Pour over the bread and push bread into the mixture so that all the bread is covered with the mixture. Cover and let sit until ready to bake, place in the fridge if leaving overnight.
Preheat the oven to 190C and sprinkle the bread pudding with the sugar. Bake for about 15-20 minutes, or until golden and puffy. Leave to settle for a few minutes, then serve.